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20121128
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spoke thursday about the future of u.s. foreign policy. the syrian civil war, and other challenges facing the middle east. this came at a forum hosted by "foreign-policy" magazine. she also answer questions. this is an hour. [applause] >> madam secretary, today we solve all your problems. nothing left to worry about, really. actually, the office of policy planning and the foreign policy group made a bet we could bring together leaders from inside government from leaders outside government to have a real discussion about the future of american foreign policy. is there to say based on the conversation we had today that that has paid off. that is especially thanks to say paanalysts and participants to mid really impressive than insightful interventions over the course of the day. i also want to give a special thank you to people at the foreign-policy group and policy planning office, who were the heart and soul of putting today together. if you've given a quick round of applause. -- you could give them a quick round of applause. [applause] we made a second bet that david could shine a
, the republican party for vice president and president nominated candidates who not only had zero foreign policy between them but no coherent policy whatsoever about what to do about the war and didn't mention it. while we have 66,000 americans in that war right now. we have serious things to make serious decisions about as a country. how do we turn down the nonsense enough to hope that our political process can be the means by which we make these grave and serious decisions? joining now is senator jeff merkley of oregon, chief sponsor of the amendment that passed calling on an accelerated withdrawal of u.s. forces from afghanistan. senator merkley, congratulations on the success of that amendment today. >> thank you very much, rachel. it's an incredible amount of things happening around the world today. >> yeah. i feel like this is one of those moments when i have very high hopes and very high wishes for what our political process will be capable of doing, and i have to say, seeing your amendment passed today in such a bipartisan fashion with so much republican support made me have some hope th
of the constitution. every major political issue we've had, foreign policy is very much a constitutional issue. it's very much studying the way that we are. >> tying those things together if i may, one of the important policies with the five, four vote that was against wiretapping without mirandized and suggests that the rate precisely the word for dear slater wrote with prohibition. >> a quick question on this. we don't do that now. it's just done by law. >> because laws are very easy to undo. the majority of congress today passes the love with the affordable health care act. it's undone by this time. before there was a repeal of any amendment, it it's beyond being a fat dude by the ripples and waves of partisan policy. [inaudible] [inaudible] so that's about the drinking age. the federal government has a law to improve their highways. if you want the money it makes her changes. so everybody in the spaces can or cannot be sent thing. so we've got money for you. if you want the money you have to tell your citizens -- [inaudible] >> it is based on the commerce clause. the federal government could p
we sort of to set politics and issues aside. she bring as 21st century approach to foreign policy. one that is in step with president obama. she also has a great deal of passion for human rights and human dignity. what john kerry has passion for nobody is really sure. he is kind of a vanilla buy. she understands issues of poverty and pandemic and how though pray into national security and foreign policy. jon: on the other hand, senator mccain says, john kerry came within a whisker of being president of the united states, angela. senator mccain went on to say this, i would love to hear him make necessary case. i don't have anything in thinks background like the tragedy in gaziano that would make me carefully examine the situation. >> it is doing susan rice. if kerry is the nominee he would have smooth sailing through. in washington these are friends behind the scenes. if susan rice is nominee we'll have partisan politics. we have the liberal mainstream media already bashing republicans, some calling them racists and sexist in the fact they won't support susan rise because the fact
's exactly what ari was saying which is the president is asking who is most in sync with my foreign policy? ambassador rice is someone who helped form late the obama foreign policy. i think senator kerry would too. democrats are now in a position where we have an embarrassment of riches. i really hope they don't start worrying about this or that political matter. in democrats can't win elections in massachusetts, there's something fundamentally wrong with what we're doing. >> he did win the last time, scott brown. not this time but the time before he won in massachusetts. we got to leave it there. paul, ari, guys thank you. the search is now on the for the country's latest multimillionaire. in the next hour we'll have the latest on where the winning tickets in the power ballot ri were sold. and coming up next, accusations a u.s. ally is now helping iran cheat on international economic sanctions by helping sell its oil for gold. [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yel
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
was offering in terms of economic direction, foreign policy direction. had to reflect on the road we've just traveled in the last four years and as voters do, they spent a lot of time thinking about the future. so in the next four years who can i trust on the economy, on social issues and foreign policy. and we live in a country that is even pli divided politically and we have close elections. our victory in 2008 was a landslide. it was clear this election was going to be closer, fwiven the economy and divisions in the country. with that being said, we still won electoral college, maybe not a landslide but a clear majority. our popular vote is 3% which is a healthy margin. and i think the reason we won is people understood where we had been economically. all of you have lived through the recession. this is not something that is an academic theory. everyone painfully lived through the recession. we are beginning to recover from that. the economy has created jobs over 5 fnt 5 million jobs which our economy is far too week but the electorate said i'm beginning to feel some progress. does that m
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)